Breaking News: The CDC F’ed Up. Use their hashtag on everything you post. #vaxwithme

The CDC website says. CDC’s #VaxWithMe Social Media Campaign has been updated In an effort to promote all vaccinations as an important prevention method for protecting against serious, and even deadly diseases, CDC has updated its #VaxWithMe social media campaign to encourage individuals to be aware and up-to-date on recommended vaccines for themselves and their family for every stage of life. The new #VaxWithMe campaign seeks to drive visibility of vaccination across a person’s lifespan, spark engagement around the importance of vaccination for all ages, and generate a movement that encourages individuals to be aware of recommended vaccinations for all ages, lifestyles, jobs, travels, and health conditions. CDC encourages individuals to join the campaign  by sharing messages, post, tweets, photos, and videos with the hashtag #VaxWithMe on social media to promote their support and participation in getting recommended vaccinations. Learn more about the new #VaxWithMe campaign here! Historical Success of the 2014-2016 #VaxWithMe Selfie Social Media Campaign: The Viral Spread of Flu (Message) The #VaxWithMe selfie social media campaign was created in 2014 to drive visibility of flu vaccination, spark engagement around the importance of vaccination, and ultimately, generate a movement that encouraged more people to get their flu vaccination every year. Between September 2014 and April 2015, 552 participants used the #vaxwithme hashtag 827 times, generating 18.4 million impressions.1 The campaign was awarded Honorable Mention by the 2015 Hermes Creative Awards in the Digital Marketing Campaign category.2 The #VaxWithMe flu vaccination Selfie campaign encouraged individuals to share photos and videos of themselves (tagged #VaxWithMe) during or after getting their flu vaccination. The operative word for the #VaxWithMe campaign was...

L-Cysteine in bagels and cakes is made from human hair or duck feathers.

L-Cysteine is a common ingredient is made from human hair, cow horns or pig bristles or duck feathers. Would you eat a bagel with hair in it? It’s in there to make bread and cakes last longer.  According The Guardian, the human hair comes from Barber shops and beauty salons in China. If you want to avoid this, try buying your breads at a bakery. Share...

Vanilla part 4: This is Real Vanilla.

This is a real vanilla bean. Despite what you may think, real vanilla is a long black bean. You know a product has real vanilla if it has tiny black dots in it. Many vanilla flavored products are yellow and that’s not real vanilla, that’s just added food coloring. If you were to cut open one of these, you scrape the inside and add it to things you want to add real vanilla. The taste is so much better than the fake stuff.   Share...

Vanilla part two. Fake Vanilla called Vanillin comes from Paper mills.

    Vanillin is not vanilla, it’s residue from paper mills. Massachusetts Institute of Technology  made vanillin from a biopolymer of  pulp. 60% of vanilla comes from the lignin in paper which smells like vanilla.  The problem is that this fake vanilla can cause behavioral problems in children, and the Feingold diet explicitly avoids it, and the Environmental Working group offers a skin irritation or allergy as well.   Share...